How to Easily Avoid Filter Installation Problems

Correctly installing your Eaton industrial filter is the first step in ensuring the life expectancy of your unit – as well as optimal performance. Incorrect installation can affect the filter’s systems, cause it to operate poorly or physically damage the equipment.

The following list is a brief collection of easily-avoidable installation conditions that may cause problems during filter installation:

Low System Pressure

Since DCF and MCF™ filters rely on a purge operation to clear captured solids from the filter, having enough system pressure is important to successful purging. Eaton  recommends a minimum of 30 psi of system pressure to ensure an adequate purge. This pressure may need to be higher when the process liquid has high viscosity or the solids are sticky. The Stealth Purge option with external water flushing is an alternate solution that is independent of system pressure.

Purge Line Plumbing

A common error when installing mechanically-cleaned filters is incorrectly plumbing the purge line. The best situation for a purge line is to make it short in length, placing it on a downhill grade from the filter, and draining it into a collection tank. Since typical purge operations are less than 1 second in duration, there is very little flow in a purge line due to system pressure.

If the line runs uphill, solids will collect in the line and never flush away. In addition, a water flush line on the purge header may be needed if the purged materials are especially challenging.

Check Valves On Filter Outlet Plumbing

Running an outlet line into long, head-high runs (such as uphill) is an uncommon, yet potentially damaging situation. When the filter purges, a water-hammer situation may develop if flow reverses from the outlet side of the filter.

In the worst case scenario, this may cause the elements to collapse. However, this situation is easily prevented by placing a flow check valve on the outlet line from the filter.

Filter Placement Around Pumps

Since Eaton filters are pressure filters, they should always be placed on the outlet side of pumps. Placing the filter on the suction side of a pump may result in erratic operation or damage to the filter elements.

Backpressure on outlet lines Eaton filters will always work best when there is some backpressure on the filter’s outlet. The worst performance scenario for a filter is when the outlet runs directly to an atmospheric tank. For this reason, we recommend the installation of a flow orifice or control valve on the outlet header of the filter. By providing a slight amount of back pressure, the system will operate much more evenly and avoid pressure blinding.

Backwash Filter Media

When your filter’s backwash outlet line runs to an atmospheric tank, Eaton recommends using a flow orifice sized to prevent excessive differential pressure across the filter media during the backwash operation. This will prolong the life of the filter media.

External Backwash Liquid

The fluid source used in external backwash filter systems should be clean – and have particles smaller than the rated retention of the filter elements in the system. If these conditions are not met, the backwashing process can actually plug the elements instead of cleaning them.


Questions?  Just #AskFilterman on Twitter!

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Eaton Creates Waves of Innovation at ACHEMA 2012

Frankfurt … No, this isn’t a typing error in the heading! Let us explain. Diversified industrial manufacturer Eaton Corporation today announced it will be presenting its filtration products at this year’s ACHEMA at not one but two booths –both visually linked by a bright, rippling wave.

At the world’s largest trade show for chemical engineering, environmental protection, and biotechnology the company will be exhibiting a veritable firework display of technical systems for liquid filtration. Eaton’s filtration’s product portfolio has never been so comprehensive. By integrating the German companies Internormen and Begerow into the Eaton family, clients now have access to extremely diverse competence in filtration.

The focus will be on filtration applications for pharmaceutical technology, industrial process and utility, and the chemicals and fine chemicals industries in particular. Each application will have its own product display, where visitors are invited to come and talk shop with Eaton’s filtration specialists. The company will not only enhance the tactile experience of product presentation, but will also make use of modern media to answer questions on the technologies and products presented in full detail.

For the industrial sector Eaton has a number of innovative solutions that redefine operating times and set new standards in the classification and maintenance of hydraulic and lubricating oil liquids. These include unique complete solutions, measuring technology for analysis and diagnostics, and filter systems that guarantee that equipment operates with the maximum efficiency thanks to lower maintenance times and longer service intervals.

Eaton Begerow BECOPAD ThumbDepth filtration will be another topic at the trade show. The innovative BECOPAD product, the only mineral-free depth filter medium worldwide, and BECODISC stacked disc cartridges serve filtration applications primarily in the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries. Depth filter cartridges, membrane filter cartridges, and presentations of filter systems and housings of the highest quality round off our filtration portfolio.

Lastly, Eaton’s new pleated filter bag will be on display. This series of products is distinguished by its high dirt holding capacity and long service life compared to similar standard filter bags and cartridges. Eaton will also present a broad spectrum of application solutions and products for use in process filtration.

Experience the power of one with Eaton’s filtration business.

Eaton’s international filtration team is looking forward to plenty of interesting discussions.

ACHEMA 2012 from June 18 to 22 2012
Exhibition center (Messe Frankfurt) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Hall 5.0 | Booths D59 and D62

Processing chocolate? Eaton’s filtration business has the perfect solution for you.

Did you know that Eaton’s filtration business has extensive experience with the processing of chocolate and other cocoa products.

Some specific examples include:

  • Milk, white and dark chocolate
  • Chocolate-based coatings and frostings
  • Chocolate beverages
  • Cocoa mass or liquor
  • Cocoa butter
  • Cocoa powder
  • Pectin for jams and marmalades

Water is introduced many times in the beginning processing stages to filter out shells, dirt, bugs and larvae. The water is recycled many times and then re-circulated – our filtration systems can help to make this process more efficient and more complete.

Our industrial filtration systems are used in a number of processes, a few specific examples include:

  • Harvesting
    Once removed from the trees, the cocoa pods are split open to release the beans that are embedded in a pulp. When the pods are broken the beans and pulp are sterile, but they become contaminated with a variety of microorganisms from the pods, laborers hands, insects, vessels used for transport etc.
  • Fermentation
    During fermentation complex chemical changes take place in both the pulp surrounding the seeds and within the seeds themselves, and the chocolate flavor is developed. The pulp surrounding the beans develops the color and flavor of the beans. Cleaning The beans are cleaned and can then undergo a form of thermal pre-treatment to separate the shell from the bean. One form of thermal pre-treatment uses infrared technology in which the beans undergo infrared radiation on a ‘ fluidized’ bed or vibrating conveyor. Water accumulates on the surface of the bean and bursts the shell.
  • Shell Removal
    The beans are then separated from the shells. Water is introduced many times in this stage to filter out shells, dirt, bugs and larvae. The water is recycled many times and then recirculated.
  • Grinding
    The nibs are ground to make cocoa liquor. There are two stages of the grinding process. In the first stage, the beans are ground using various methods and will produce liquid mass called cocoa liquor. There are two possible ways to continue to the second stage: either the cocoa liquor is further processed into cocoa butter and cocoa powder (usually only done with low-quality beans), or chocolate.
  • Pressing
    When the nibs are ground, the resulting liquid produced by the friction is called cocoa liquor. Giant presses squeeze cocoa butter from the liquor then refined.
  • Deodorizing
    Typically cocoa butter extraction is done through a solvent, then refined and deodorized. However, if it is extracted by any other method, a strong cocoa aroma will be present. If this odor is undesirable, the addition of a deodorizing process is necessary. This process is usually completed using superheated steam under a vacuum. The steam strips and distills volatile substances from the butter. This process takes anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours depending on the deodorization requirements.
  • Cooling
    The cocoa butter is cooled and filtered for any final particulate that might remain. It is then prepared for the storage drum.
  • Conching
    This two stage process (dry and liquid) involves the heating of the chocolate to a pre-determined temperature to add viscosity. It is also used to eliminate any unnecessary remaining moisture. Many times the following liquid stage necessitates the addition of cocoa butter.

We offer a wide variety of filters for Food and Beverage processes. Visit Eaton today to learn more about our Food and Beverage filtration products.

How to Remove the Hidden, Ongoing Costs of Disposable Media Filters in the Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals Processing Industries

The hidden, ongoing costs of disposable media are a cause for concern. Learn how you can achieve greater process efficiency, while bringing your costs down.

Liquid is a main ingredient in the processing of chemicals, and efficient and effective filtration can improve your bottom line! From industrial chemicals to polymer processing, fluid clarity and purity are essential in the pursuit of high-quality finished products.

Traditionally, chemical engineers have opted for disposable media filters such as bags or cartridges due to their lower initial cost. While initial cost may be lower for small batch operations, this is seldom true for continuous operations that require a costly, redundant filtration system – including piping, valves, support, and service connections – to maintain production.

Moreover, there are significant hidden costs associated with disposable media filters. When users purchase disposable media filters they often fail to account for the true costs of doing so.

Hidden costs:
To begin, there’s the ongoing disposable filter purchase price, which typically runs at least $3 per bag or cartridge per day, plus the ongoing cost of waste disposal.  For non-hazardous waste, disposal is already $400-$800 USD per drum, while that of hazardous waste is approaching $1,000 per drum. It’s not unusual for the typical pharmaceutical company or other fine-chemical based manufacturer to produce up to 20 drums per year of filter media for disposal, not counting the cost of treating or eliminating any run-off process fluids. Beyond this, there is significant labor costs involved with transporting, handling and storing disposable filter media, as well as with replacing it.

Example:
For just a small 30-gpm cartridge filter with six 10-inch cartridges, the operator must:
Remove 16 separate parts including the cover, compression seals, cartridges, and seal plates.

The operator must reassemble all 16 parts with proper alignment to ensure good seals. Then someone must haul away the spent filter media.  There’s also a housekeeping cost for cleaning any spillage from disposable media, along with increased emissions, safety risk, and liability. Then there’s the potential cost of disposable media rupturing or overflowing (as bags sometimes do), contaminating product or machinery downstream and slowing production. Finally, add the cost of buying, maintaining, and cleaning workers’ protective clothing for replacing disposable media. As well as the extra time and labor required to fill out MSDS forms and other paperwork required for items hauled to landfills or incinerators.

This is where Eaton’s automatic filtration and separation productscan make your operation more efficient, and most importantly improve the finished product quality. Eaton’s Automatic Self Cleaning Filters and Strainers assure continuous flow, simplified maintenance and worry-free operation.  The self cleaning product line includes tubular backwashing and mechanically cleaned technology. Eaton’s Model 2596 self cleaning strainer is available in custom designs and exotic materials upon request. Learn more at www.eaton.com/filtration

 

by Ask Filter Man

Quick Tip from AskFilterman: Strainers, Temperature and Pressure

Here is a quick tip from our very own Filterman:  Remember, there is a direct relation between temperature and presuure. As temperature goes up, the pressure the strainer can handle goes down! For more quick tips follow AskFilterman on Twitter today!

How to Avoid Common Industrial Filter Installation Mistakes

Correctly installing your self-cleaning filter is the first step to ensuring the life expectancy of your unit as well as optimal performance. Incorrect installation can affect the filter’s systems, cause it to operate poorly or damage the equipment. The following is a brief collection of easily avoidable installation conditions that may cause problems during filter installation:

Low System Pressure

Since self-cleaning filters and magnetically coupled filters rely on a purge operation to clear captured solids from the filter, having enough pressure is important to successful purging. I recommend a minimum of 30 PSI (2 bar) of system pressure to ensure an adequate purge. This pressure may need to be higher when the process liquid has high viscosity or the solids are sticky. The Stealth Purge option with external water flushing is an alternate solution that is independent of system pressure.

 

Purge Line Plumbing

A common error when installing mechanically-cleaned filters is incorrectly plumbing the purge line. The best situation for a purge line is to make it short in length, placing it on a downhill grade from the filter, and draining it into a collection tank. Since typical purge operations are less than 1 second in duration, there is very little flow in a purge line due to system pressure. If the line runs uphill, solids will collect in the line and never flush away. In addition, a water flush line on the purge header may be needed if the purged materials are especially challenging.

 

Check Valves on the Filter Outlet Plumbing

Running an outlet line into long, high head runs (such as uphill) is an uncommon, yet potentially damaging situation. When the filter purges, a water hammer situation may develop if flow reverses from the outlet side of the filter. In the worst case scenario, this may cause the elements to collapse. However, this situation is easily prevented by placing a flow check valve on the outlet line from the filter.

 

Filter Placement Around The Pumps

Since Eaton filters are pressure filters, they should always be placed on the outlet side of pumps. Placing the filter on the suction side of a pump may result in erratic operation or damage to the filter elements.

 

Back Pressure On Outlet Lines

Eaton filters always work best when there is some back pressure on the filter?s outlet. The worst performance scenario for a filter is when the outlet runs directly to an atmospheric tank. For this reason, we recommend the installation of a flow orifice or control valve on the outlet header of the filter. By providing a slight amount of back pressure, the system will operate much more evenly and avoid pressure blinding.

 

Backwash Filter Media

When your filter?s backwash outlet line runs to an atmospheric tank, we recommend using a flow orifice sized to prevent excessive differential pressure across the filter media during the backwash operation. This will prolong the life of the filter media.

 

External Backwash Liquid

The fluid source used in external backwash filter systems should be clean ? and have particles smaller than the rated retention of the filter elements in the system. If these conditions are not met, the backwashing process can actually plug the elements instead of cleaning them.

 

For more information on resolving these or other filtration challenges visit the AskFilterman on Twitter!

 

 

Eaton Aquires Begerow – Liquid Filtration Specialists

 Annouced yesterday Eaton has completed the acquisition of German liquid filtration system producer E. Begerow which develops and produces filter media and filtration systems. Begerow develops and produces innovative filter media and filtration systems for a variety of applications and markets including food and beverage, chemical, pharmaceutical and industrial applications.

Based in Langenlonsheim, Germany, Begerow employs approximately 270 people around the world and reported 2010 sales of more than $84m.  Eaton said that with teh aquisition of E. Begerow it will enhance the company presence in the liquid filtration market and strengthen its current filtration offerings by adding advanced filtration technologies to the portfolio. Learn more about Eaton’s Filtration business here.